@jondot

CTO at Como. Big data. Fullstacker. Hacker. Open sourcer.

ZeroMQ and Ruby a Practical Example

For a specific high-performance workloads, I wanted to include a new and highly optimized endpoint onto Roundtrip.

If you don't know what Roundtrip is yet, feel free to quickly check out the previous Roundtrip post and come back once you got the idea of what it does.

I had to select both a wire protocol and an actual transport that will be very efficient. To gain an even higher margin over HTTP, I knew I wanted it to be at least binary and not very chatty.

A good option for this would be Thrift, for example. However I wanted to go as low as I could, because I didn't really need anything more than the bare simplest RPC mechanism.

However, going with straight up TCP wouldn't gain me much because I typically hold development ease and maintainability as an additional value. There was only one thing I felt offering an awesome development model and being as close to (or even better than, on some occasions) TCP...

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Tracking Your Business

You've built (or are maintaining) a product which has many services that span over different machines at the backend. These services are all orchestrating together to implement one or many more business processes.

How are you tracking it?

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Pragmatic Concurrency With Ruby

I'm coming from a parallel computation, distributed systems background by education, and have relatively strong foundations in infrastructural concurrent/parallel libraries and products that I've built and maintained over the years both on the JVM and .Net.

Recently, I've dedicated more and more time building and deploying real concurrent projects with Ruby using JRuby, as opposed to developing with Ruby (MRI) with concurrency the way it is (process-level and GIL thread-level). I'd like to share some of that with you.

Feel free to bug me on twitter:

Administrative notes<<EOF:

This may come as a lengthy information-packed read. You can put the blame on me for this one because I wanted to increase the value for the reader as much as possible and pack something that could have been a lengthy book, into a single highly concentrated no-bullshit article.

As an experiment, I also put most of the example code in a repository including the source of this article. Please feel free to fork and apply contributions of any kind, I'll gladly accept pull requests.

Github repo: https://github.com/jondot/pcwr

EOF

Translations

This article was recently translated to Serbo-Croatian language by Anja Skrba from Webhostinggeeks.com - Thanks Anja!

Concurrency is Awesome!

Remember those old 8-bit games you used to play as a child?. In a hindsight - you know its awesome, but if you're a gamer or just a casual gamer, and you're forced to play it today, the graphics will feel bad.

This is because it’s a detail thing; just like childhood computer games, as time passes, it seems like your brain doesn't care (or forgets) the proper details.

So given that one is an MRI Ruby developer, her mindset would be that concurrency just works, and it is easy and awesome. But you might be right guessing that due to the level of cynicism going around here - it isn't the end of it.

The MRI Ruby GIL is gracefully keeping some details away from you: yes things are running in parallel with the help of properly built I/O libraries (for example: historically, the MySQL gem was initially not doing it properly, which meant your thread would block on I/O), but surely, code isn't running in parallel. It's just like what your brain did when it covered up for those horrific 8-bit graphics that you were sure are still awesome.

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Building Your Tools With Thor

Thor is not new; first built as a rake and sake replacement, first commit is well over 4 years ago.

Jump ahead several years and Thor is part of the foundation of the new-generation rails generator, and very popular tools such as Bundler and Foreman.

Recently, @wykatz emerged a fantastic looking (and much deserved) Thor website, and although I've started doing Thor based projects over two years ago, I think its the right time to write about Thor itself.

Today, Thor can serve as a rake replacement, great generator building framework, and a general purpose CLI toolkit.

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first look at mruby

mruby is minimalistic Ruby, developed by Matz (Ruby's creator) and funded by the Japanese ministry of Economy.

I've been waiting for this to go public since Matz' early announcements of him being working on it. This is very exciting.

Installing

  $ git clone https://github.com/mruby/mruby
  $ make

Compilation is a fantastic error-less breeze, around 20 seconds.

Hello mruby

Lets see how this thing should work.

$ cd bin
$ cat > hello.rb
puts "hello mruby!"
^D
$ ./mruby hello.rb 
hello mruby!
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